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Childhood asthma and food allergies increase the risk of premenstrual dysphoric disorder

Childhood asthma and food allergies increase the risk of premenstrual dysphoric disorder

Premenstrual dysphoric disorder can cause both physical and psychological symptoms, and often has a negative impact on daily life. An estimated 20-30% of women of childbearing age are affected by premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMS), while about 2-6% experience the more severe form of PMDD (premenstrual dysphoric disorder) associated with significant impairment in social functioning.

Previous research suggests that inflammation may be a contributing factor to the development of premenstrual dysphoric disorder. However, knowledge is limited and there is a great need for continued research. The aim of the current study was therefore to investigate whether inflammatory conditions in childhood, such as asthma and allergies, could contribute to premenstrual problems in adulthood.

Using a large US longitudinal cohort study with detailed information, researchers at IMM, along with collaborators from Harvard Medical School, University of Island and University of Massachusetts Amherst, were able to conduct the first prospective cohort study into the current question and thus increase knowledge of the biological background of premenstrual disorders.

The study findings form an important basis for mechanistic research on inflammation and premenstrual disorders. The findings also highlight the importance for caregivers of being aware of the risk of PMS in girls with asthma or food allergies.

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