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Fish guide for 2023: Here are the fish you can eat with a clear conscience

Fish guide for 2023: Here are the fish you can eat with a clear conscience

  • Farmed Norwegian salmonhaddock (among others from the Barents Sea and the Norwegian Sea)
  • mackerel (Northeast Atlantic Ocean)
  • Herring spawn spring (Northeast Atlantic Ocean)
  • sprat (Baltic Sea)
  • Char – (Swedish)
  • catfish (Iceland)
  • Alaska pollock
  • red light

    • cod (Barents Sea and Norwegian Sea, fished by bottom trawls)
    • North sea shrimp (Skagerrak, Kattegatt, Norwegian Channel, Swedish, Danish and Norwegian Fishing)
    • Yellowfin tuna (caught in the Indian Ocean)
    • Skip Jack (Tuna caught in the Indian Ocean)
    • Baltic herring (Baltic Sea)
    • eel

    published September 28, 2023

  • Sea bream (Swedish fishing)
  • Rainbow (Swedish)
  • look (Barents Sea and Norwegian Sea – fished with purse seines)
  • Blue mussels (Among others grown in Sweden, Denmark, Germany and France.
  • Skip Jack (Tuna is caught by line or rod in the Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean, or some parts of the Pacific Ocean)
  • oyster (grown in France)
  • Freshwater crayfish (Cultivated Türkiye)
  • Sea bream (Swedish fishing lake Mälaren, Lake Vänern and the Baltic Sea)
  • American whitefish and sole roe
  • sea ​​bass (caught by handline or rod in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean)
  • Yellow light

    red light

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    published September 28, 2023

    Every year, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) releases its Fish Guide, which helps make sustainable choices for fish and shellfish. The guide places the fish in the categories of green light (good choice), yellow light (be careful), and red light (don’t do it).

    When WWF now publishes the 2023 guide, it appears that Baltic herring, which previously received a yellow light, are now receiving a red light along with Baltic cod. Meanwhile, sprats in the Baltic Sea are now slipping from green light to yellow light.

    – The delicate ecosystem of the Baltic Sea is dangerously imbalanced. It’s emergency mode and time to pull the handbrake. Large commercial food fish in the Baltic Sea such as cod, sturgeon and sprat are now at alarmingly low levels. Getting the oceans and their people back on track is critical to healthy marine ecosystems and a sustainable economy, says WWF Secretary-General Gustav Linde, in a commentary.

    Several types of green light transition to yellow light

    Cod in the Barents Sea and Norwegian Sea, which previously received a yellow light, now receive a red light. Likewise North Sea prawns from the Skagerrak, Kattegat and the Norwegian Channel. In the northeast Atlantic, mackerel and spring herring, common in our herring cans, turn from green to bright yellow. Among other things due to high fishing pressure and low biomass.

    The newcomer gets the green light

    The most satisfying news in this year’s guide is that the newcomer has now been given the green light. It is a giant prawn grown in the United Kingdom, Germany, Austria and Switzerland that can be eaten with a clear conscience. It also appears brighter for sprats caught in drift trawls in the Skagerrak, Kattegat and the North Sea, which are switching from yellow light to green light due to decreased fishing mortality and increased abundance of spawning fish.

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    In the fish guide, WWF has mapped 95 species, of which 23 have been given the green light. Five species — shark, rockfish, Argentine red shrimp, and Swedish lobster — end up only at red lights.

    facts

    Here are the fish you can — or can’t — eat with a clear conscience

    Green light

    • Sea bream (Swedish fishing)
    • Rainbow (Swedish)
    • look (Barents Sea and Norwegian Sea – fished with purse seines)
    • Blue mussels (Among others grown in Sweden, Denmark, Germany and France.
    • Skip Jack (Tuna is caught by line or rod in the Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean, or some parts of the Pacific Ocean)
    • oyster (grown in France)
    • Freshwater crayfish (Cultivated Türkiye)
    • Sea bream (Swedish fishing lake Mälaren, Lake Vänern and the Baltic Sea)
    • American whitefish and sole roe
    • sea ​​bass (caught by handline or rod in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean)

    Yellow light

    • Farmed Norwegian salmonhaddock (among others from the Barents Sea and the Norwegian Sea)
    • mackerel (Northeast Atlantic Ocean)
    • Herring spawn spring (Northeast Atlantic Ocean)
    • sprat (Baltic Sea)
    • Char – (Swedish)
    • catfish (Iceland)
    • Alaska pollock

    red light

    • cod (Barents Sea and Norwegian Sea, fished by bottom trawls)
    • North sea shrimp (Skagerrak, Kattegatt, Norwegian Channel, Swedish, Danish and Norwegian Fishing)
    • Yellowfin tuna (caught in the Indian Ocean)
    • Skip Jack (Tuna caught in the Indian Ocean)
    • Baltic herring (Baltic Sea)
    • eel

    published September 28, 2023