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China warns of new virus coming from animals

Flying dogs, a type of bat, are among the animals that carry the Heniba virus that has now been discovered in humans in parts of China.  Archive the image.
Flying dogs, a type of bat, are among the animals that carry the Heniba virus that has now been discovered in humans in parts of China. Archive the image.

China is now warning of a new virus that can spread from animals to humans.

It is reported that 35 people have contracted the virus called “Langia” or Lev.

None of those infected should develop any serious symptoms, but the disease originates from a deadly family of viruses.

35 people in China Infected with a new virus said to have come from wild animals. This was reported by many media outlets.

The virus, called “Langia,” or Leaf, has been found in two provinces in China – Henan and Shandong.

The 35 people infected should have mild symptoms, but the virus is feared to be serious.

It must, according to scientists, originate from the deadly Nipah virus.

Those infected should show symptoms similar to those of the common flu, according to the Daily Mail.

It comes from animals

The virus originally came from animals. It is said to be found in bats and shrews. It is not yet fully ascertained whether people can infect each other.

Symptoms of the patient are fever, fatigue, cough, muscle pain and lack of appetite. Some sufferers are also said to have impaired kidney function and liver problems.

Chinese researchers are said to have detected the virus in 71 of the 262 flies examined. It has also been reported to have been found in bats, dogs and goats.

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The LayV virus belongs to the same family as the Nipah virus, which is transmitted in the same way as covid, but is significantly more lethal. Reportedly 75 percent of those infected die.

The World Health Organization has listed Nipah as one of the viruses that could cause the next major epidemic.

There is currently no vaccine against Nipah, but several vaccines are currently being developed.